Just after the October-22 event of the fruit company, Apple!

Hey, finally as its second event in fall, new iDevices have already fallen  out of  the fruit company, Apple. Personally, devices seem to be below what I formerly expected, but it is an Apple tradition. Still, apparently, they seem to be the top-notch devices among the other non-Apple products on the market although the same cannot be said for their prices. Anyway, the biggest thing Apple announced yesterday, October 22, seems to be the new iPad, which is iPad Air, but not iPad 5, probably due to a big reduction in its weight. For the ones who are interested and thinking of buying any new iDevices, here is a comparison compiled by redmonpie.com and I hope it might give you an idea about which one to buy.

Apple cannot resist coming through with the confusing names, and now we find ourselves with the iPad 2, fifth-gen iPad Air, iPad mini, and the new iPad mini with Retina display. With so many options both old and new, allied to Apple’s almost arbitrary naming patterns, it may be a rather confusing state of affairs, so here, we take a close look at the four Apple tabletsincluding features, specs and prices.

The main, full-size iPad range now consists of the iPad 2, which Apple continues to sell despite its age, as well as the iPad Air, which should perhaps have been given the iPad 5 moniker. The differences between the two, in both specs and price, are glaring, but while those simply looking for an iPad to run iOS 7 and enjoy general use can still rely upon the trusty older model, those in search of something a little more cutting-edge and up-to-date will want to check out the new iPad Air.

iPad-Air-iPad-mini-2

At a full $100 cheaper than the newly-released iPad Air, the iPad 2 is still a relatively appealing prospect, and although there’s no 4G and only 16GB of storage space available with both the Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + Cellular models, it’s a very good value tablet.

The antiquated iPad 2 is now the same price as the current gen iPad mini and outdates the first-gen iPad mini, which was first released around this time last year. Both are rather similar technically, the iPad 2 and the first-gen iPad mini, using the same A5 processor and offering identical display resolution. Apple’s pricing makes a great deal more sense than the naming scheme, with both the iPad 2 and iPad mini seemingly on an even keel; leaving the consumer to make a judgment based purely upon preference.

Obviously, both the iPad Air and iPad mini with Retina display offer a sharper visual experience, and since each also includes the A7 processor and M7 motion coprocessor, those looking for a higher-end experience will want to grab one of the premier devices.

One very interesting thing about the chart, when you see each iPad side-by-side, is that now, the newer iPad mini is actually just as good as the flagship iPad Air, and although the latter is more expensive, the up-take on the compact model is likely to be, in my opinion, significantly higher than that of the full-size model.

iPad-Air-comparison

Having seen each in a concise, official manner, which iPad will you be picking up? Do share your thoughts and comments below!

Here are the links to acces to different and up-to-date post on innovative devices or else.

http://www.apple.com/ipad/compare/

http://www.redmondpie.com/ipad-air-vs-retina-ipad-mini-2-vs-ipad-mini-vs-ipad-2-comparison-chart/

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An amazing poll app: “Socrative”!

A lot of people make use of state-of-the-art apps to enhance their teaching and classroom management. iOS is, as known and appreciated by most people, has so many apps that smoothly run and make educators’ job easier. One app that could be highly appreciated by so many educators and that is available on all platforms in addition to its web version is certainly “Socrative”. I am sure that a lot of people use apps for polling and they can really make your life easy in class.

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Some examples of how you can use them in class:

1. Simply, you want to choose a class representative or assign someone a task, and you would like it to be fun and to use technology for it. If you do not want to use technology, you can write the names on board and want everybody vote openly or in a closed way. However, using Socrative or similar polling apps, you simply ask your students go to socrative.com and tell them your room number or name. Then, as a teacher at that moment you enter the names quickly on Socrative through its web version or using Socrative Teacher app. Then, while Ss are voting, you reflect it on the board with a projector, then it is magically beautiful to watch a bar chart showing the number of votes for each candidate.

2. Another example is that you are at the beginning or the end of the lesson, you want to ask students’ opinions about the class as a warm-up or wrap-up. Simply open Socrative Teacher app, tell your students go to Socrative and your room. Then you start an exit-test for a pulse-check and then watch it happening.

3. There is no limit for your creativity, but you can also prepare any kind of test in advance using Socrative quiz templates and then do it in a space race format where you can watch groups race against each other by answering the questions.

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All in all, polling apps and tools are really effective and convenient instruments for educators and Socrative is a good model among them. Go to socrative.com or download the apps and see what you can do with that.